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Extinction by NAIS





















 

Windt im Wald Farm
Geauga County, Northeast Ohio
since 1995

THE COLORADO RANGER HORSE

In 1878 while on a tour of the world, General Ulysses S. Grant, later to be President of the United States, developed a friendship with Sultan Hamid of Turkey. Sultan Hamid presented Grant with two horses" the Arabian stallion named Leopard and the Barb stallion named Linden Tree. Both horses are listed in the Arabian Horse Registry and the American Jockey Club and figure prominently as well in the development of the Colorado Ranger Horse.

Sometime close to 1900 both Leopard and Linden Tree were moved from the farm of Randolph Huntington, where they had been used in the development of a trotting horse, to the farm of General George Colby of Nebraska. The family of Ira Whipple were responsible for introducing these horses, popularly known as Colorado Ranger Horses, to Colorado. The group of mares and stallions traced their ancestry to an inbred son of Leopard and to daughters of either Leopard or Linden Tree. Today all Colorado Ranger Horses or Rangerbreds trace their ancestry to both Patches and Max. In 1934 two of the Colorado Ranger stallions, Leopard #3 and Fox #10, both leopard-patterned, were exhibited by Mike Ruby at the National Western Stock SHow in Denver, Colorado. In 1935 Mr. Ruby officially founded the breed known as the Colorado Ranger Horse Association. Several months later, the Appaloosa Horse Club was formed, accepting horses of the very same leopard-patterning and ancestral connections to Leopard and Linden Tree.

The Colorado Ranger Association is not a color breed so registered Rangerbreds can be solids, or roans,or carry ablanket-patterns or be leopards. A registration requirement is ancestry to either Patches of Max, but Rangers can be Thoroughbred, Appaloosa, Quarter Horse, Arabian, or AraAppaloosa.

Diane Jones
Windt im Wald Farm
 

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